The temperature in your office can sometimes be an ongoing battle: is it too hot, too cold, or just right? Fluctuating temperatures can not only be frustrating to employees in the office, but it can surprisingly affect their productivity.

Our brains are complex machines and it doesn’t take much to get preoccupied. When the brain is distracted with monitoring body temperature it’s easy for the person to get sidetracked by that and concentration can quickly be lost. This can mean that productivity declines. Experts say that the optimal temperature is between 69.8 and 71.6 degrees Fahrenheit, according to a 2006 study by Helsinki University of Technology. In a 2004 study from Cornell University, researchers discovered that employees that are consistently cold will make more mistakes. In contrast, if the office is too hot, employees will fill sluggish, fatigued, and irritable, which can also lead to a loss in productivity.

Is your heating and cooling system unreliable or does it have a difficult time keeping up with the demands of your office? It’s important to keep your system maintained well so it can keep every employee comfortable day in and day out. If it’s time for an upgrade or a system replacement, it’s well worth the cost and could actually save you money in the long run. If your thermostat is kept low in the winter and high in the summer, it could ultimately cost you more money down the road because of the loss of employee productivity.

Has it been a while since your office furnace has been checked out by a professional? Regular maintenance is key to keeping it running at optimum efficiency. Or, maybe your heating and cooling system is out of date and inefficient. Spring is a great time to replace it – before the hot weather sets in during the summer! In addition, there are a variety of rebates and incentives happening for 2017 on a variety of systems, so you can save money, too. Contact our team of professionals today for an appointment!

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